Digital Literary Pedagogy: An Experiment in Process-oriented Publishing

Roger Whitson, Kimon Keramidas, and Amanda Licastro

Digital Literary Pedagogy: An Experiment in Process-Oriented Publishing

What classroom roles do journal editors have in the digital age? Roger Whitson invited JITP editors Amanda Licastro and Kimon Keramidas into his class on “The Nineteenth-Century Novel” to explore how editors can supplement traditional classroom instruction and investigate the purpose of design and digital publishing in literary period courses. The course involved a history of reading and book-design in the nineteenth century, along with assignments that encouraged students to experience reading and writing in different modalities. Over the course of twenty months this project has resulted in a wide variety of content, both formal and informal. To display that process and those materials, the authors have designed this project in the form of the interactive timeline below, which gives the scope of the project as a whole. Included in the timeline are date markers of specific milestones and events that took place during the process but don’t link to any specific product, links to documents and multimedia elements created in the evolution of that process, and links to the final formal articles published in the journal.

In the timeline, the authors have presented the website Whitson made for his class; the site designed by the students for the final project; a final reflective Google Hangout between the JITP editors, Whitson, and his class; drafts of the authors’ work in progress on Google Docs; and links to the final written pieces for the journal. The two articles by Whitson, Keramidas and Licastro reflect on the process and products of this collaboration. Whitson’s “Digital Literary Pedagogy: Teaching Technologies of Reading the Nineteenth Century” explores the unique way literary studies can contribute to digital pedagogy by highlighting the historical and cultural contexts of editorial and publication practices in the nineteenth century and comparing them to similar media shifts occurring today on podcasts, in blogs, and on streaming video. Keramidas and Licastro’s “Practicing Collaboration in Process and Product: A Response to ‘Digital Literary Pedagogy’” frames the class from the perspective of journal editors who contributed to the teaching of the course and illustrates the complications of teaching students to combine audience awareness, multimedia design, and period-specific literary content. Together these separate elements reflect different stages and manifestations of the process of instruction, reflection and production that occur as teachers and students consider and execute the role of technology in pedagogy and publication.

 

About the Authors

Roger Whitson is Assistant Professor of English and Digital Technology and Culture at Washington State University. Most recently, he is the author (with Jason Whittaker) of William Blake and the Digital Humanities: Collaboration, Participation, and Social Media (Routledge 2012). He has written “How to Survive a Graduate Career,” published by Workplace: A Journal of Academic Labor; and “Altac and the Tenure-Track” for The Chronicle of Higher Education, as well as a number of pieces about Blake and the genre of steampunk. He is currently working on a special issue of Romantic Circles devoted to “Blake & Pedagogy” and a book theorizing steampunk within emergent practices of critical making, digital humanities, and alt-history.

Kimon Keramidas is Assistant Professor and Director of the Digital Media Lab at the Bard Graduate Center, where he is responsible for the development and implementation of digital media practices across academic programs and for the Focus Gallery project. Kimon also serves on the Editorial Collective of The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy and is Director of Digital Initiatives for the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center where he leads new initiatives in the integration of digital media in support of the center’s programs. Kimon’s academic research centers on two areas of study: the role of intellectual property in contemporary theatrical production and the sociocultural impact of interface design in personal computing. Kimon has had articles published in the journals Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy and Currents in Electronic Literacy, in the collections Objects of Exchange (co-authored with Aaron Glass), Theater und Medien: Theatre and the Media, and Studying the Event Film: The Lord of the Rings (co-authored with Henry Bial and Ryan Reynolds), and on the sites Profhacker and Mediacommons’s The New Everyday.

Amanda Licastro is a doctoral candidate in the English Program at the Graduate Center, CUNY and is an Instructional Technology Fellow at Macaulay Honors College. She is currently working on her dissertation, which focuses on student writing in online open spaces, and recently completed her certificate in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy through an independent study involving her work on the Writing Studies Tree. Amanda is also a co-director of the CUNY Digital Humanities Initiative and serves on the Editorial Collective of The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy.




'Digital Literary Pedagogy: An Experiment in Process-oriented Publishing' has 5 comments

  1. January 21, 2015 @ 2:18 pm Tales from a Silver Medalist: Publishing an Interactive, Collaborative Article in JITP |

    […] peer-review process, this presentation will chronicle the production of the article “Digital Literary Pedagogy” as an example of how editors of online academic journals can work with contributors to expand […]

    Reply

  2. January 16, 2015 @ 1:37 pm #MLA15 Presentation » Digitocentrism

    […] peer-review process, this presentation will chronicle the production of the article “Digital Literary Pedagogy” as an example of how editors of online academic journals can work with contributors to expand […]

    Reply

  3. June 12, 2014 @ 2:26 pm Digital Literacy Pedagogy — Teaching College English

    […] “Digital Literacy Pedagogy: An Experiment in Process-Oriented Publishing” at the Journal… has some very interesting information. […]

    Reply

  4. February 6, 2014 @ 6:27 pm Riki Thompons

    Love the interactive timeline! I so appreciate the interactivity and visual components offered. Great way to utilize the venue. :)

    Reply

  5. December 2, 2013 @ 2:10 pm Table of Contents: Issue Four

    […] Digital Literary Pedagogy: An Experiment in Process-Oriented Publishing Roger Whitson, Kimon Keramidas, and Amanda Licastro […]

    Reply


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